Copyright 2018 - Maasai Mara University. All right Reserved.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

Tourism is currently the world’s single largest  trade with forecasts  suggesting even  greater potential  for growth.  However, the industry is highly competitive, especially with regard to the standard of services. Consequently,  the staff  who  handle tourists  must  be trained  to  acquire appropriate  skills  and attitudes. Such  training at  various  levels is  required  in hotel,  restaurant,  and institutional management; transport,  travel  and tour  operations  management; tourism  promotion  and marketing;  recreational planning;  wildlife  conservation and  management;  and other  tourism related  areas.   In  addition,  the demand  for  tourism reflects  tastes  and trends  in  personal consumption.    This calls  for  constant research  on  consumer tastes  and  aspirations in  order  to determine the quality and quantity of desired tourism products.

The Bachelor of Tourism Management (BTM) program aims at producing high caliber, but broadly inter-disciplinary professionals who are skilled in the aspects of tourism planning, development and management. These professionals will also have been  exposed  to  a variety  of  the global natural  and  cultural habitats  which form the basis of tourism activities. The program emphasizes the student centered learning approach  in which  the main training  characteristics include  combinations of  problem based  learning, project oriented  work-based  and cooperate  learning.    After completion  of  the training,  the  BTM graduates should  be equipped  with  competencies (knowledge,  skills  and attitudes)  in  planning, development  and management  of  tourism and  recreation  resources in  ways  that enhance sustainability. Training  for the BTM program will emphasize practical work,  fieldwork  and industrial  attachments  in keeping  with  the Mission  of Maasai Mara University of producing practical, development-conscious and extension-oriented graduates.

1.1       Philosophy of program

To be a lead provider of quality education in tourism and hospitality training to meet market needs and enhance sustainable development.

1.2       Rationale of the program

Tourism is one the key drivers of development globally accounting for 9% of the global GDP and generating 1 out of 11 jobs (UNWTO, 2014). Despite the opportunities presented by the tourism, the industry globally has been grappling with the challenge of inadequate man power. This situation is reflected in Kenya as identified by the National Tourism Strategy 2013-2018 which identifies lack of adequate manpower especially at higher levels as one of the weaknesses affecting Kenya’s tourism industry.

The industry is also very dynamic necessitating continuous training and upgrading of skills by the people already working in it for better service delivery. The BTM program seeks to meet these needs. It aims at producing graduates who can meets immediate industry needs and also drive the industry innovatively in to the 21stcentury.

The programme is therefore informed by a situational analysis of stakeholders requirements. It targets fresh high school graduates who meet the minimum entry requirements, graduates from other disciplines who wish to join the tourism industry, existing tourism employees who need to advance their careers and capacity and teachers of tourism who wish to refresh or broaden their grip on tourism.

Career options for BTM graduates include employment in tourism development and Management, state-funded tourism organizations, travel agency services, airport services, spa & boutique, hotel management, leisure resorts operations, front office management, event & conventions management, wildlife conservation, culture and heritage tourism development.

1.3 Programme Overall Goal

The  overall goal  of  the  BTM  program is  to  provide students  with  knowledge, skills  and appropriate attitudes that will enable them  to  effectively participate  in the development  of  tourism  as an  academic  discipline and  to  improve the  quality of services  in the  tourism industry.

1.4 Program Objectives

  1. To provide training  programs which  are  flexible, relevant,  rigorous  and consistent  with the  best tourism  practice  and; which  also,  embody the  principles  of ethical  practice  and social responsibility.
  2. Provide students with appropriate knowledge, skills and competencies in strategic tourism planning, policy formulation, and management of tourism enterprises.
  3. To provide students  with appropriate  knowledge,  skills and  competencies  that will  enable them  to integrate  various  parameters (social,  cultural,  economic, environmental, technological and political parameters)  in planning,  organisation  and  management  of the tourism industry.
  4. To provide students with appropriate knowledge, skills and competencies in tourism product development, tourism service delivery and tourism marketing and promotion.
  5. To enable students to develop appropriate research methods and skills in the development of quality tourismincluding  aspects  of operational  quality control management, strategic approaches to  quality  management, analysis  of  performance indicators,  and  best practice in national and international tourism development.
  6. To provide students  with  appropriate knowledge,  skills  and competencies  in  human resource management for the strategic planning and development of sustainable tourism.

2.0 TARGET GROUP

This programme targets:

     2.1 High school graduates who meet the minimum entry requirements.

     2.2 Graduates from other disciplines who wish to join the tourism industry.

     2.3 Existing tourism employees who need to advance careers and capacity.

     2.4 Teachers of tourism who wish to refresh or broaden their grip on tourism.

3.0 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Minimum entry requirement: KCSE C+ (plus), or an equivalent qualifications from institution(s) recognized by University Senate. In addition, applicants must meet specific minimum requirements in respective subjects as per Faculty / School/ Institute/Departmental requirements as determined by the Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC).

NB: Diploma holders with Credit Pass and above in relevant subjects,(Tourism  and Wildlife Management, Tourism  Management, Travel  and  Tour Operations Management and Hotel Management)qualify for entry into second year of study while those with Higher National Diploma in relevant subjects qualify for entry into third year of study.  

4.0 CREDIT TRANSFER

Applicants seeking transfer of credits for similar courses taken in other institutions recognized by the university senate may:

  1. a) Send a formal application seeking transfer of credits, justification of the request and attach evidence of the credentials, which would support such request;
  2. b) Apply for transfer of credit, which is processed only after paying the prescribed exemption fee; appropriate credits earned from other recognized/accredited universities by undergraduate students may be accepted provided they are equivalent and relevant to the Tourism Management Degree Programme offered at Maasai Mara University.

5.0 DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME

The duration of the degree course normally extends for a period of four (4) academic years.

6.0 CLASSIFICATION OF DEGREES

CLASSIFICATION

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

PERCENTAGE LEVEL

FIRST CLASS

3.68-4.00

70% and above

UPPER SECOND CLASS

3.33-3.67

60% -69%

LOWER SECOND CLASS

3.00-3.32

50% -59%

PASS

2.00-2.99

40% -49%

7.0 REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

To be able to satisfy all the requirements for graduating in this programme:

  • Candidates must satisfy  a  minimum of  168  Units and  a  maximum of  192 Units provided for in this programme
  • Candidates must also, as part of the units, complete two industrial attachments in relevant sectors of the tourism industry.
  • Candidates must also  choose  a foreign  language,  among the  French,  German, Spanish  and Chinese  on  offer, and  study  it  to  completion as  provided  for  in  the curriculum. 

8.0 PROGRAM STRUCTURE

There  are a  total  of eight  semesters  in the  complete  four years  BTM  training period  (Table  1). The BTM training program consists of core and elective courses.  Each academic  year is  made  up  of  two semesters  that  consist of  six  distinct Core Courses  (three  Courses per semester).  A  Course is  a  specific learning  and  instructional unit  which  falls within  a  main instructional  theme, and  consists  of specific  learning  objectives (aims)  that  are supposed  to  be covered within that unit. A  Credit hour of  Study  is a  one-hour  lecture per  week  per  semester/ or two hours of Problem Based Learning (PBL)/ workshop per week per semester or three hours practical per week per semester.

Table 1: Program Structure

SEMESTER

CORE COURSES

ELECTIVES

TOTALS

 

NO.

CREDIT HOURS

NO.

CREDIT HOURS

NO.

CREDIT HOURS

CREDIT HOURS

1

7

21

-1

-3*

8

24

24

2

6

18

-1

-3*

7

21

21

3

7

21

-1

-3*

8

24

24

4

6

21

-1

-3*

7

24

24

5

7

21

-1

-3*

8

24

24

6

6

21

-1

-3*

7

24

24

7

7

24

-1

-3*

8

27

27

8

5

12

-1

-3*

6

18

18

TOTAL

51

162

8

24

59

186

186

* Minimum credit hours for candidates undertaking Spanish or German or French or Chinese as foreign language

 9.0 PROGRAM SEQUENCE

Semester

Theme

Credit hours

1stSemester

The Tourism System

24

2ndSemester

Services Management

21

3rdSemester

The Business of Tourism

24

4thSemester

Tourism Planning and Development

24

5th  Semester

Strategic Management of Tourism  I

24

6th  Semester

Strategic Management of Tourism  II

24

7thSemester

Sustainable Tourism Development

27

8thSemester

Tourism Trends

18

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

186

10.0 ASSESSMENT / EXAMINATIONS REQUIREMENTS

10.1     Common Maasai Mara University undergraduate examination regulations shall apply

10.2     For the courses, Continuous Assessments shall normally constitute 30% of the final marks and the End of Semester Examinations 70%.

10.3     Field Courses will contribute part of continuous assessment from Year One to Year Three.

10.4     For the Courses, the distribution of Marks will be as follows (Table 2):

Table 2: Marks Allocation

ALLOCATION 

MARKS

 

Course Term Paper/Field course Report

15

Sit-in Continuous Assessment Test

15

Workshop Presentation 

 

End of Semester Examination   

 

70

TOTAL

 

100

11.0 MONITORING AND EVALUATION

This will involve progress report on the degree program within the School. The program will be reviewed every 4-6 years.

12.0 TEACHING STRATEGIES AND METHODOLOGIES

The  teaching strategies  and  methodologies that  will  be employed  in  the delivery  of  this program will include:

12.1     Lectures

12.2     Workshop/Seminars

12.3     Field Courses

12.4     Blended Learning (e-learning)

12.5     Distance learning 

13.0 CURRICULUM STRUCTURE

YEAR ONE

13.1 SEMESTER ONE                    THEME:  THE TOURISM SYSTEM

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
CMJ 1100 Communications Skills 3
ZOO 1100 HIV and AIDS and Lifestyle diseases 3
BTM 1103 Introduction to Tourism 3
HHM 1103 Introduction to Hospitality Operation 3
WRM 1103 Introduction to fauna and flora 3
BTM 1104 Principles and Techniques of Tour Guiding 3
BTM 1105 Introduction to Physical and Human Geography 3
BTM 1106 Beginners’ French or 3
BTM 1107 Elementary German I or 3
BTM 1108 Beginners Spanish I or 3
BTM 1109 Writing Chinese Characters and Speaking Chinese 3
TOTAL 24

13.2 SEMESTER TWO                   THEME: SERVICES MANAGEMENT

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
COM 1200
Computer and Information Literacy
3
MAT 1200
Quantitative Skills
3
BTM 1203 Service Operations and Marketing 3
BTM 1204 Human Resource Management 3
BTM 1205 Principles of Accounting 3
BTM 1206
French Structure I
3
BTM 1207
Elementary German II or
3
BTM 1208
Beginners Spanish II or
3
CHIN 1209
Writing, Speaking and Reading Chinese        
3
BTM 1210 Bushcraft and Guiding Techniques 3
TOTAL 21
TOTAL UNITS (YEAR ONE)    45

YEAR TWO

13.3 SEMESTER ONE                    THEME: THE BUSINESS OF TOURISM

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ENS 2100 Environmental Skills 3
REL 2100 Philosophy and Critical Thinking 3
BTM 2103 Tourism Economics  3
BTM 2104 External Environment 3
BTM 2105 Principle and Practices of Management 3
BTM 2106 Tourism Innovation and Diversification 3
BTM 2107 Social Issues in Tourism 3
BTM 2108 French Structure II 3
BTM 2109
Intermediate German I or       
3
BTM 2110 Beginners Spanish III or 3
CHIN 2111 Intensive Reading and Writing in Chinese   
TOTAL 24 

13.4 SEMESTER TWO              THEME: TOURISM PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
BTM 2203 Tourism Law and Practice  3
BTM 2204 Tourism Policy and Planning  3
BTM 2205 Tourism Product Development 3
BTM 2206 Tourism and Environmental Management 3
BTM 2207 Project Development and Management 3
BTM 2208 Intermediate French or  3
BTM 2209 Intermediate German II or 3
BTM 2210 Intermediate Spanish I or 3
BTM 2211
Chinese Speaking and Listening      
3
BTM 2212 Industrial Attachment I 3
TOTAL 24
TOTAL UNITS (YEAR TWO)    48

YEAR THREE

13.5 SEMESTER ONE            THEME: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF TOURISM I

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
BTM 3103 Quality Management Systems  3
BTM 3104 Strategic Marketing Management 3
BTM 3105 Travel and Tour Operations Management  3
BTM 3106 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making 3
BTM 3107 Financial Management and Control  3
BTM 3108 Airfare and Ticketing and Information Systems 3
BTM 3109 Research Methods  3
BTM 3110 French for Tourism I or 3
BTM 3111
Advanced German I or  
3
BTT 3112 Intermediate Spanish II or  3
CHIN 3113 Extensive reading and listening comprehension  
TOTAL 24

13.6 SEMESTER TWO            THEME: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF TOURISM II

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
BBM 3200 Entrepreneurship Skills 3
BTM 3203 Destination Management  3
BTM 3204 Consumer Behavior  3
BTM 3205 Meeting, Incentives, Conventions and Events  3
BTM 3206 Statistics and Data analysis  3
BTM 3207 French for Tourism II or  3
BTM 3208 Advanced German II or 3
BTM 3209 Intermediate Spanish III or  3
BTM 3210
Chinese for Tourism    
3
BTM 3211 Industrial Attachment II 3
TOTAL 24
TOTAL UNITS (YEAR THREE)    48 

YEAR FOUR

13.7 SEMESTER ONE                  THEME: SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
BTM 4103 Domestic Tourism  3
BTM 4104 Cultural and Heritage Tourism 3
BTM 4105 Adventure and Sports Tourism 3
BTM 4106  Wildlife Based Tourism   3
BTM 4107 Coastal and Marine Based Tourism  3
BTM 4108 Community Based Tourism 3
BTM 4109 Senior Project 6
BTM 4110 Business French or  3
BTM 4112 Chinese Language Computer Programs  3
TOTAL 27

13.8 SEMESTER TWO                   THEME: TOURISM TRENDS    

CODE COURSE/COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
BTM 4203 Introduction to Complex System 3
BTM 4204 Special Interest Tourism 3
BTM 4205 Leisure and Recreation Management   3
BTM 4206 Sustainable Tourism 3
BTM 4207 Contemporary Issues in Tourism  3
BTM 4208 Oral Expression 3
BTM 4209 German in the Hotel Industry or  3
BTM 4210 Advanced Spanish or 3
BTM 4211
Advanced Chinese for Tourism 
3
TOTAL 18
TOTAL UNITS (YEAR FOUR)    45

GRAND TOTAL                                                                            186

1.0. UNIVERSITY VISION, MISSION AND PHILOSOPHY

1.1Vision

The Vision of Maasai Mara University (MMU) is “to be a world class university committed to academic excellence for development”.

1.2 Mission

The Mission of Maasai Mara University is “to provide quality University education through innovative teaching, research and consultancy services for development”.

1.3 Philosophy

The Philosophy of MMU is “to promote holistic education for both students and staff through teaching, research, innovation and extension, in order to promote social, economic and political development of Kenya and beyond and to realize sustainable conservation of the environment through natural resource management and tourism”.

2.0 INTRODUCTION

Wildlife conservation and management is a dynamic and multi-disciplinary field. It draws knowledge, information, principles, concepts and practises from both the sciences and arts. The activities of wildlife conservation and management cover cultural, environmental, biological, social, economic and political facets. There is need for the sound stewardship of our natural resources to sustainably meet our current needs and for posterity. The B. Sc. in Wildlife Management aims at producing individuals who are dynamic, adaptive, and focussed in the science, planning, management and administration of wildlife resources. Graduates with this diversity of training will be expected to take up positions in a cross-section of careers in wildlife conservation and management, environmental management and conservation, wildlife research, education and extension. The B. Sc. in Wildlife Management is therefore tailored to meet the following objectives:

3.0 COURSE OBJECTIVE

3.1General Objective

To provide students with appropriate knowledge in wildlife biology and environmental Conservation for participating and/or advising in all matters of wildlife conservation and management

3.2 Primary Objective

To produce an individual sufficiently grounded in knowledge in wildlife conservation and ecological principles and practice

3.3 Secondary Objective  

To produce an individual grounded in leadership skills and team building abilities that will enhance his contribution to wildlife conservation and management

3.4 Specificlearning outcomes of the program

  • To equip students with knowledge and skills necessary for survival in a natural recreational environment and knowledgeable in field techniques
  • To provide entrepreneurialknowledge and skills in the management of wildlife enterprises.
  • To provide students with knowledge and skills in cultural, environmental conservation and management techniques
  • To provide knowledge and skills to conduct wildlife research, extension and pursue postgraduate studies.
  • To produce individuals who can interpret and apply wildlife policies and law for the management, conservation and utilization of wildlife and related natural resources for community development.
  • To produce individuals who are adaptive, dynamic and transformative
4.0     ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
4.1       Direct Entrants from School

In addition to meeting the minimum general university admission requirements, fresh school leavers must fulfill KUCCPS cluster requirements.

‘A’ level school leavers must have scored a minimum of division two in secondary school and two principal passes in high school. ‘A’ level candidates will join the programme in Year I.

4.2       Mature Entrants
  • Eligible mature entrants will have a minimum of ‘O’ level certificate of Division 2 and must have worked for at least three years in a relevant field.
  • Mature entrants with a minimum of KCSE or its equivalent who have passed with an average of C+ or its equivalent and in addition have successfully completed a certificate course with credit from a recognized institution in a biological field and have not less than two years working experience in a relevant field. KCSE mature entrants will join the course in Year I.
  • Diploma holders from a recognized institution who will have attained a distinction or a credit pass in a related biological field. Diploma holders will join the course in Year II.
  • Diploma holders from a recognized institution who will have attained pass in a related biological field or environmental field BUT have additional minimum of 3 years’ experience as research assistants in KWS or credible research organisations will be admitted and join in Year II.
  • Candidates who are holders of Higher National Diploma (HND) and those with Advanced Diploma Certificate in a relevant biological field will join the B. Sc. Wildlife Management course in Year III. In addition they must have at least two years working experience in a relevant field.

4.3 Regulations on Credit Transfer

Credit transfers shall be accepted for purposes of student mobility and recognition or prior learning.

  1. In line with the existing qualification frameworks, credit transfers shall only be accepted from accredited institutions and programmes;
  2. Credit transfers may be permitted up to a maximum of 49% of the core course units for similar programmes at the same level.
5.0      PROGRAMME DURATION AND GRADUATION
            REQUIREMENTS

5.1       The course is normally spread over four years leading to the award of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management. The course begins with the basic sciences in the first year with the objective of giving the student a broad exposure and solid basis in the sciences. At the end of the first year, students undertake an Outward Bound Course in order to be introduced to the need for personal physical fitness, survival and first aid techniques, wilderness ethics and leadership skills necessary in the wildlife management profession. Thereafter through the successive years, course gradually builds on theoretical knowledge and practical skills in the fields of wildlife biology and ecology. At the end of the third year, students are attached to either a protected area or a wildlife conservation area so as to have orientation and exposure to actual field conditions. This broad and yet focussed approach is geared to producing seasoned natural resource managers and wildlife conservation and management professionals. 

5.2       Course Distribution

Courses will comprise of either 2 or 3 credit hours. This is equivalent to 2 or 3 lecture hours per week or their equivalent in tutorials, practicals or field demonstrations during the semester.

6.0       EXAMINATION REGULATIONS

6.1       The common university semester examination regulations shall apply.

6.2       Admission to examination will depend on satisfactory attendance of the prescribed courses as per senate regulations.

6.3       All courses shall be examined by continuous assessment (tests, term papers, laboratory and field trip reports, seminar presentations) and semester university examinations except for the field courses WRM 1204: Outward Bound Training and WRM 3209 : Field Attachment and WRM : Senior Project.

6.4       Whereas continuous assessment will vary from course to course depending on the nature of each course, the end of semester examinations will be of 2 hours duration.

6.5       WRM 1204: Outward Bound Training will be assessed by the participation and performance of the student on assigned duties in the field. WRM 3209: Field Attachment will be assessed from the student’s written report (50 %), Field Supervisor’s written report (30 %) and performance of assigned duties while in the field (20 %) as assessed by the visiting lecturer. The Senior Project (WRM) will be assessed solely on the written report of the student with marks distributed as follows: Abstract (5%), Literature review (10 %), Data collection and result analysis (30 %), Discussion and management recommendations (20 %), Oral presentation (15 %).

  • A student will not graduate unless he/she satisfactorily completes the field courses WRM 1204: Outward Bound Training, WRM 3209: Field Attachment and WRM: Senior Project.

 

7.0       SCHEDULE OF COURSES

Year 1

Semester I

Code Course Title Credit Hours
BOT 1103 Introduction to Plant Biology 3
ZOO 1103 Introductory Zoology 3
CHE 1150 Basic Chemistry I 3
CMJ 1103 Communication Skills 3
ZOO 1100 HIV and AIDS and Lifestyle Diseases 3
GEO 1103 Introduction to Geography 3
WRM 1103 Natural History of Flora and Fauna of East Africa 3
MAT1103 Basic Mathematics 3
Total Credit Hours   24

Semester II

Code Course Title Credit Hours
BOT 1204 Survey of Plant Kingdom 3
COM 1200 Computer and Information Literacy 3
CWRM 1203 Introduction to Natural Resources Management  2
WRM 1204 Outward Bound Training  3
WRM 1205 Swimming & Survival Techniques 2
FEM 1203 Plant Ecology 3
MAT 1200 Quantitative Skills 3
CHE 1251 Basic Chemistry II 3
Total Credit Hours   22

Year 2

Semester I

Code Course Title Credit Hours
FEM 2103 Introduction to Soil Science  3
REL 2103 Philosophy and Critical thinking 3
WRM 2103 Introduction to Ecology   3
WRM 2104 Statistics for Wildlife 3
ZOO 2108 nvertebrate Zoology  3
ENS 2103 Introduction to Remote Sensing 3
FEM 2104 Plant Taxonomy 3
Total Credit Hours   21

Semester II

Code Course Title Credit Hours
ENS 2203 Introduction to Natural Resource Economics 3
FEM 2203 Introduction to GIS  3
WRM 2203 Marine Ecology and Oceanography  2
WRM 2204 Society and Conservation  3
WRM 2205 Wetland Conservation 2
ZOO 2209 Vertebrate Zoology  3
WRM 2206 Community Ecology   3
WRM 2207 Wildlife Policy and Law 2
Total Credit Hours   23

Year 3

Semester I

Code Course Title Credit Hours
WRM 3103 Ornithology  3
WRM 3104 Mammalogy  3
WRM 3105 Behavioral Ecology  3
WRM 3107 Herpetology   3
WRM 3108 Population Ecology   3
WRM 3109 Human dimensions in Natural Resource Management 3
WRM 3110 Conservation Genetics 2
Total Credit Hours   20

Semester II

Code Course Title Credit Hours
WRM 3203 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology  3
ENS 3203 Landscape Ecology and GIS 3
WRM 3204 Entomology for Wildlife Management 3
WRM 3206 Fundamentals of Research  2
WRM 3207 Wildlife Diseases and Pathology  3
BBM 3200 Entrepreneurship Skills  3
WRM 3209 Field Attachment 6
Total Credit Hours   26 

Year 4

Semester I

Code Course Title Credit Hours
WRM 4103 Wildlife Nutrition 3
WRM 4104 Planning and Management of Protected Areas 3
WRM 4105 Avian Management  3
WRM 4106 Wildlife Economics   3
WRM 4107 Wildlife utilization  3
WRM 4108 Engineering for Wildlife Management   2
WRM 4109 Senior Project  6
Total Credit Hours   23

Semester II

Code Course Title Credit Hours
BWRM 4203 Wildlife Management  3
WRM 4204 Contemporary Issues in Wildlife Conservation 3
WRM 4205 Park Management  2
WRM 4206 Conservation and Development  3
WRM 4207 Human Wildlife Conflicts and Management  3
WRM 4208 Ecological Modeling   3
WRM 4109 Public Education &Extension and Professional Ethics  3
WRM 4210 Tropical Ecology 3
Total Credit Hours   24
  1. BACKGROUND

1.0.1 UNIVERSITY VISION

The Vision of Maasai Mara University (MMU) is “to be a world class university committed to academic excellence for development”.

1.0.2 UNIVERSITY MISSION

The Mission of Maasai Mara University is “to provide quality University education through innovative teaching, research and consultancy services for development”.

1.0.3 UNIVERSITYPHILOSOPHY

The Philosophy of MMU is “to promote holistic education for both students and staff through teaching, research, innovation and extension, in order to promote social, economic and political development of Kenya and beyond and to realize sustainable conservation of the environment through natural resource management and tourism”

1.1UNIVERSITY MINIMUM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

As stipulated by Maasai Mara University Senate, the minimum entry requirement for undergraduate degrees is KCSE C+. In addition, the regular government sponsored students are admitted upon meeting the requirements stipulated by the Kenya Universities and Colleges Central Placement Service (KUCCPS). 

  1. a) C+ for Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) holders or its equivalentas determined by the Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC);
  2. b) KNEC diploma or its equivalent.

1.3 THE PROGRAMME

1.3.1 TITLE

The title of the Programme is Bachelor of Hotels and Hospitality Management

2. BACHELOR OF HOSPITALITY AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT

2.0 INTRODUCTION

The teaching of hospitality in universities corresponds with the increasing economic importance of the hospitality industry worldwide. Currently tourism and hospitality are the world's fastest growing industry, and forecasts suggest great potential for growth. However, hospitality as an academic discipline is not well established in most developing countries, especially in Africa. In this regard, the School of Business and Management at Maasai Mara University was established to provide Hotel and hospitality management.

The Bachelor of Hotel and Hospitality Management (BHHM ) program aims at producing highly trained professionals in all aspects of hospitality The programmer emphasize , the student centered learning approach in which the main training characteristics include combinations of problem based learning, project oriented/work-based and cooperate learning the Module approach will be used in delivering the program On completion of the training the BHM  graduates should be equipped with competencies (knowledge, skills and altitudes) in planning, development and management of hotels and other hospitality establishments. Training in the Department of Hotel and Hospitality emphasizes practical work, in-house training and industrial attachments in keeping with the mission of Maasai Mara University or producing practical, development-conscious and extension-oriented graduates

2.1OVERALL OBJECTIVE

The overall objective of the Hotel and Hospitality Programme is to provide student with knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes in hospitality management in order to enable them to effectively participate in the development of hospitality as an academic discipline and to improve the standards of management in the hospitality industry.

2.1.1 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the degree Programme are to:

  1. Provide training programs which are flexible, relevant rigorous and consistent with the best tourism and hospitality practice, which also, employ the principle of ethical practice and social responsibility
  2. Provide students with appropriate knowledge skills and competences in strategic planning and hospitality management that will enable them to integrate various parameters (i.e. social, cultural, economic, environmental, technological and political parameters in planning organization and management of the overall hotel industry in Kenya.
  3. Provide students with appropriate knowledge, skills and competencies in hospitality product development, hospitality operations, hospitality service delivery, hospitality marketing and promotion
  4. Enable students to develop appropriate research methods and skills in the development of quality hospitality services including aspects of operational quality, control management, human resource management strategic approaches to quality management and analysis or performance indicators. 

3. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Candidates must meet Minimum University entry requirements of Maasai Mara University in addition; mature entry candidates must meet the following additional requirements

  1. Candidates must have passed KCSE with C+ with a minimum grade C in, English or Kiswahili and mathematics D+
  2. Must have successfully completed a relevant courses recognized by the University senate such candidates must have passed with at least a credit and have at least one year relevant working experience after obtaining a diploma
  3. Diploma holders with credit and above from recognized institutions will enter in the Second Year of study.

3.0 DURATION

The duration of degree course is 4 academic years.

4.    EXAMINATION REGULATION

Continuous assessment test (CAT) shall constitute 30% of the final marks and end of semester examinations, 70%

  1. The other University senate approved examination regulation will be followed.

5. COURSE STRUCTURE

5.0 YEAR ONE

YEAR ONE SEMESTER I

TOURISM SYSTEM

SEMESTER II

SERVICE MANAGEMENT

CMJ1100

Communication skills

3

COM 1200

Computer and information literacy

3

ZOO 1100

HIV and AIDS and Lifestyle diseases

3

MAT 1200

Quantitate skills

3

BTM 1103

Introduction to Tourism Management

3

BHM 1203

Principles of management

3

BHM 1103

Introduction to hospitality operation

3

BHM 1204

Introduction to accounting

3

WRM 1103

Natural history of East Africa flora and fauna

3

BHM 1205

Introduction to marketing

3

BHM 1104

Food and beverage production theory

3

BHM 1206

Food and beverage production practice 1

6

BHM 1105

Food and beverage service theory

3

BHM 1207

Food and beverage service practice 1

3

 

Foreign language

 

 

Foreign language

 

BTM 1107

Elementary German I

3

BTM 1207

Elementary German II

3

BTM 1106

Beginners French

3

BTM 1206

French structure I

3

BTM 1108

Beginners Spanish

3

BTM 1208

Beginners Spanish II

3

BTM 1109

Writing Chinese characters and speaking Chinese

3

BTM 1209

Writing speaking Chinese

3

Credit Hours

24

Credit Hours

27

5.1 YEAR TWO

YEAR TWO

SEMESTER I

FOOD AND BEVERAGE PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

YEAR TWO

SEMESTER II

HOSPITALITY SERVICE   

ESN 2100

Environmental Skills

3

BHM 2203

 

                    

Introduction to computer applications in hospitality

3

REL 2100

Philosophy and Critical Thinking

3

BHM 2103

Food and beverage management

3

BHM 2104

Front office operations management

3

BHM 2105

Introduction to Food Safety and Hygiene

3

BHM 2204

Housekeeping Operations and Management

3

BHM 2106

Marketing hotels and catering services

3

BHM 2205

Consumer behavior

3

BHM 2107

Food and Beverage Production practical II

6

BHM 2206

Housekeeping practical

3

BHM 2108

Food and Beverage Service practical II

6

BHM 2207

Industrial placement

6

Foreign language

Foreign language

BTM 2109

Intermediate German I

3

BTM 2209

Intermediate German II

3

BTM 2108

French structure II

3

BTM 2208

Intermediate French

3

BTM 2110

Beginners Spanish III

3

BTM 2210

Intermediate Spanish 1

3

BTM 2111

Intensive Reading And Writing In Chinese

3

BTM 2211

Chinese speaking and listening

3

 

Credit Hours

33

 

Credit Hours

21

5.3 YEAR THREE

YEAR THREE SEMESTER I

HOSPITALITY SERVICES MANAGEMENT

YEAR THREE SEMESTER II

FACILITIES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

BHM 3103

Hospitality Operations Management

3

BBM 3200

Entrepreneurship skills

3

BHM 3104

Hospitality Services Management

3

BHM 3203

Human Resource Management

3

BHM 3105

Hospitality information systems

3

BHM 3204

Facility and Property Management

3

BHM 3106

Statistics and data analysis

3

BHM 3205

Events and convections management

3

BHM 3107

Specialized menus and international cuisines

3

BHM 3206

Research methods

5

BHM 3108

Crisis management

3

BHM 3207

Introduction to Hotel Economics

3

 

 

 

BHM 3208

Industrial Placement II (Outside Semester)

6

Foreign Languages

Foreign Languages

BTM 3111

Advanced German I

3

BTM 3208

Advanced Germany II

3

BTM 3110

French for Tourism 1

3

BTM 3207

French for tourism II

3

BTM 3112

Intermediate Spanish II

3

BTM 3209

Intermediate Spanish III

3

BTM 3113

Chinese extensive listening and comprehension

3

BTM 3210

Chinese for tourism

3

 

Credit Hours

21

 

Credit Hours

27

5.4 YEAR FOUR

SEMESTER I

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

SEMESTER II

STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HOSPITALITY SERVICES

BHM 4103

Hospitality Accounting

3

BHM 4203

Strategic Management

3

BHM 4104

Hospitality Law

3

BHM 4204

Personal development

3

BHM 4105

Financial Management

3

ELECTIVES

BHM 4106

Events planning and execution supervisory practical

3

BTM 4205

Pastry cake making and decorations

3

BTM 4107

Senior Project

6

BTM 4206

Managerial accounting

3

 

BHM 4207

International marketing

3

Foreign Language

Cluster two

BTM 4110

Business French

3

BHM 4208

Wine and bar

3

BTM 4111

German in the hotel industry

3

BHM 4209

Hotel Economics

3

BTM 4112

Advanced Spanish

3

BHM 4210

Hospitality entrepreneurship

3

BTM 4113

Chinese language computer programs

3

Foreign language

 

 

 

BTM 4208

Oral expression

3

 

 

 

BTM 4209

German in the hotel industry II

3

 

 

 

BTM 4210

Advance Spanish II

3

 

 

 

BTM 4211

Advance Chinese for tourism

3

 

Credit Hours

21

 

Credit Hours

18

 

1.           Introduction

The global population is rapidly growing and therefore the demand for high-quality protein from animal sources is rising steadily. This results in an increase in demand for animal protein. Maasai Mara University sits in the heart of the vast Maasai rangeland, a home to the greatest population of indigenous zebus. This ecosystem is changing fast, with the livestock owners embracing new husbandry technologies such as intensive dairy farming. In line with its mandate of improving community lives Maasai Mara University is seeking to train professionals and carry out research in animal health to improve animal health and welfare, increase their productivity which will in turn result in food security, and increased monetary returns from livestock keeping.

 At the same time, the need to develop capacity in animal health experts has been demonstrated by the fact that the country doesn't have enough experts to serve the animal population. Animal diseases are a major challenge and a threat to public health due the constant of zoonotic diseases. The threat is bound to escalate with the rise in population pressure, global warming phenomenon and therefore the need for more animal health and production experts, with a deep understanding of public health and environmental conservation issues. This need will lead to generation of scientific knowledge that can be used as a basis for sustainable exploitation of the animal resources, which will further improve the nutrition, and economic wellbeing of the nation. Major improvements can be achieved through scientifically enhanced management, nutrition, disease diagnostics, therapeutics and control, reproductive techniques, public health, and genetic improvement of production traits. Training highly skilled animal health and production resource scientists and managers can only meet these challenges.

Bachelor of Animal Health and Production graduates are the front line personnel and managers in the provision of animal health and production, public health and welfare services. This Bachelors course is therefore designed to provide human resource in animal health and production in order to develop the animal resource industry in Kenya as the nation aspires to realize the Vision 2030.

The four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Animal Health and Production is aimed at producing graduates with thorough theoretical knowledge and practical skills in nutrition, breeding, reproduction, management aspects of ruminant and non-ruminant animals and livestock health management in their capacity as paraprofessionals in the animal enterprise industry. The programme hopes to provide graduates with specialized knowledge of the subject but also a mind which has been trained and exposed well to establish practical scientific and technological procedures that can be applied in farm, research and industry platforms.

The Department vision is to offer basic courses and service courses for Animal science and health oriented faculties, with fast changing socio-economic and environmental concerns such as changing climatic patterns leading to reduced, shrinking land sizes, evolving customer expectations and national and international standards on issues such as animal welfare, antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

2.           Philosophy of the programme

With the ever-changing needs of the global economy, demands in science also changes. Well trained personnel are needed to sustain it through academic rigor, partnership with the industrial world and research institutions. The Bachelor of Animal Health and Production is designed to respond to the dynamic demands of the world of food production, disease control and safeguarding of public health, animal welfare and provision of health care to pets and other emerging livestock.

3.           Rationale of the Programme

Agricultural sector in Kenya contributes billion to the GDP, and livestock. Maasai Mara University is located in the biggest rangeland in the nation which is fast evolving in terms of the animal production systems, and it offers an exceptional platform for teaching and cutting-edge research. With the goodwill of the Maasai people, the university has a unique opportunity to reach out to the community.  This Bachelor of Animal Health and Production curriculum will seek to equip the students with the critical thinking and flexibility to accommodate emerging challenges in the industry, ranging from health, feeding, public health, livestock production economics to research. The students will be what Kenya needs for the future. In class, students get the latest in both theory and practical applications from dedicated staff and invited speakers. Lectures are complemented with hands-on laboratory experience and field course.

 3.1 Needs assessment/ market survey/ situation analysis

In principle, Animal Health and Production is a fundamental science build from the blocks of various sciences, which seeks to inculcate the deepest understanding of life. There is a need to increase the food production experts who can respond to the harsh realities climate change may unleash in the face of a ballooning population. With Kenya poised to be a middle-income country by 2030, the demand for wholesome and affordable animal proteins will increase and the expertise to do build this into reality has to be build. The university can therefore exploit the niche by being a leading producer of animal health and production paraprofessionals of international repute.

3.2 Justification of the programme

Maasai Mara University is located in the Kenyan rangelands renowned for animal production especially beefs. However, the dynamics of production are fast changing with climatic and land tenure changes. The demand for animal products such as milk, eggs, hides and skins, meat and fish are increasing and the demands for safe and wholesome products are increasing exponentially as Kenya heads to be a middle class nation. The University is therefore strategically placed to execute its core mandate of relevant teaching and research on animal science issues in the region and beyond.

 The Bachelor of Science in Animal Health and Production is designed to prepare students for career in the management of animal health and production for the 21st century. There is increased threat from evolving fast evolving and the emerging microbes, which calls for qualified and competent animal health practitioners, who are equipped with the latest and most advanced animal health techniques, the course will equip the students with skills and techniques that can increase food production and safeguard animal and human health even in the face of free trade which will see ease of microbe movement become a threatening phenomenon to human health. 

4.           Programme objective

  1. Train students who will be competent and para-veterinarians with anin-depth scientific and technological knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to sustainable animal production and health management;
  2. Train students to integrate the planning for and management animal resources in a dynamic agro-production of livestock and wildlife resources in terms of disease management, genetic resources conservation and improvement and appropriate reproductive technology adoption;
  3. To provide firm foundation instill social and management and creative skills that prepare the students for an innovative, inclusive and entrepreneurial career for successful undertaking of self-employment, research and development oriented careers.

5.           Expected learning outcomes of both the program

To produce para-professionals who will steer the animal resource industry in the nation to an international level by working in research, teaching, public and civil service, as entrepreneurs', investors and consultants in the animal health and production industry, whether they will be pioneers in the technology transfer and adaptation, and ensure highest quality standards.

6.           ACADEMIC REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Have a minimum aggregate of C+ (Plus) in Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) and should have a minimum grade of C + (Plus) in each of the following subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics/Physics/Geography OR C+ (Plus) in each of the following subjects: Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, Mathematics/Geography and C (plain) in English/Kiswahili, or 3rd Group II subject, or a Group III subject, or any Group IV or any Group V;

Or a minimum of C Plain in KCSE and at least a Credit Pass Diploma in Animal Health/ Agriculture/Medical Laboratory Technology from an institution approved by Kenya Veterinary Board (KVB);

Or, a minimum of a C- in KCSE with at least a Credit pass in Certificate and Diploma Animal Health/ Agriculture/Medical Laboratory Technology from an institution approved by Kenya Veterinary Board.

Or, a degree in a Biological Science from institutions approved by the Board

Or, any other qualifications equivalent to the above from an institution approved by KVB

COURSE REQUIREMENT

The B.Sc in Animal Health and Production exposes students to theory, practical, fieldwork, attachment and community service. The Department will offer academic support by providing quality services.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

  1. EXAMINATIONS AND CONTINOUS ASSESSMENT TESTS
  2. a) No candidate shall be allowed to graduate unless the candidate has passed in all the prescribed courses.
  3. b) There shall be special examination(s) for those candidates who miss the University examinations provided that such candidate(s) shall to the satisfaction of the Senate, prove that they were genuinely unable to take the examination(s).
  4. c) The pass mark for each course shall be 50%.
  5. d) This should be in terms of Continuous assessment tests (CATS), Practical in scientific courses, fieldwork, assignments, group works. The final end of semester examination shall constitute 70% of the total marks in each unit while the rest will constitute 30% of the total marks.
  6. e) As the B.Sc in Animal Health and Production degree is a non-classified, performance in each course shall be graded as follows:
  • 70% and above - Distinction
  • 60% and above but less than 70%      - Credit
  • 50% and above but less than 60% - Pass
  • Below 50% - Fail
  1. f) No candidate shall be allowed to sit for examinations without attending at least two-thirds of the lectures and all practicals.
  2. g) The University examinations shall consist of papers each covering one unit during the semester. The time allowed shall be two hours per paper, except in drawing that shall be three hours.
  3. h) Continuous Assessment shall contribute 30% and Written University examinations shall contribute 70% of the total marks, except where a course consists solely of practical work, it shall be assessed 100% by continuous assessment test, coursework and/or laboratory assignments.The weighing for continuous assessment in units that have practicals shall be as follows:
  • 15% Practicals
  • 5% Assignments
  • 10% Tests.
  1. i) Where a course has no practicals or laboratory assignments the weighting of the continuous assessment shall be composed of 20% tests, and 10% assignments.
  2. j) Practical attachment shall be assessed and graded on pass or fail basis.
  3. k)A candidate who misses an examination without a valid reason shall be deemed to have failed the examination, and shall be awarded a score of zero in the specific examination
  4. l) In order to proceed unconditionally to the second, third, and fourth year of study for the Bachelor of Science degrees in degree of Animal Health and Production, candidates must pass in all the required units.
  5. m) Candidates must pass in all the required units in the final year of study in order to qualify for the award of their respective degree.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS

 (a) A candidate shall be permitted to sit supplementary examinations in failed units up to a maximum of five units, in any one year of study.

 (b) Supplementary examinations shall normally be held at the end of the academic year during which the units have been taken.

(c) The maximum marks in supplementary examinations shall be 50% and shall not include continuous assessment marks.

(d)  A candidate who fails a unit evaluated wholly by continuous assessments shall be required to carry out additional work for examination during the supplementary examination period.

SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS

 (a)  If though unavoidable circumstances such as bereavement or sickness candidate is unable to sit for one or more examination papers, or is unable to undertake essential parts of the work for the continuous assessment the candidate may, on the recommendation of the Faculty Board of Examiners and with the approval of the Senate, be permitted to take special examinations or undertake extra work for continuous assessment.

(b) Special examinations shall be graded out of 100% and shall include continuous assessment marks.

REPEATING

(a) A candidate who fails a maximum of two supplementary units shall be allowed to proceed to the next year of study to re-sit the units, during the next time the units are being offered. Such a candidate shall be deemed to have repeated the year of study

(b) A candidate who fails more than two but less than six units after sitting supplementary examinations shall be allowed to register and re-sit the failed units externally in the subsequent academic year. Such a candidate shall be deemed to have repeated the year of study.

(c)  A candidate who fails in six (6) or seven (7) units at the ordinary university examinations in any given year of study shall be allowed to sit Supplementary Examinations but shall be allowed to repeat the failed units externally during the subsequent academic year. The candidate shall have the option of attending classes subject to payment of appropriate fees for all the failed units.  Such a candidate shall be deemed to have repeated the year of study.

(d) A candidate who fails to attend at least two-thirds of the lectures and all practical's in any unit(s) subject to a maximum of 6 or 7 units in any academic year, shall be required to re-do the unit(s) subject to (a & b above). Such a candidate shall be deemed to have repeated the year of study.

 (e)  A candidate who fails in one or less than six units prescribed under the final year of study during Supplementary Examinations shall re-sit the failed units externally in the subsequent academic year during the Ordinary Examinations when the units are offered.  Such a candidate shall be deemed to have repeated the year of study.

(e) During the entire period of study, no candidate shall be allowed to repeat any year of study twice

(f) During the entire period, no candidate shall be allowed to repeat a total of more than two years of study in the Department of Food Science and Technology, Horticulture, Animal Health, Production and processing and Land Resources Planning and   Management

RE-ADMISSION

(a) A candidate may be re-admitted to the year of study from academic leave, or on compassionate grounds such as bereavement or sickness, on the recommendation of the Faculty Board of Examiners and with the approval of the Senate

 (b)  A candidate who has been re-admitted after completing the first semester of academic year successfully shall be allowed to register only for the second semester of the academic year he/she is being re-admitted into.  The results of the examinations taken in the first semester shall stand.

DISCONTINUATION

  1. A candidate who fails in eight (8) or more units at the ordinary University examination in any academic year shall be DISCONTINUED.
  2. A candidate who fails a unit after a total of four attempts shall be DISCONTINUED.
  3. A candidate who fails in any unit after re-sitting externally, even after Supplementary Examinations shall be DISCONTINUED.
  4. A candidate who repeats the year of study after failing six (6) or seven (7) units at the Ordinary University Examinations, and subsequently fails in any unit during the Supplementary Examinations at the end of the repeating year shall be DISCONTINUED.

TRANSCRIPTS

At the end of each academic year, candidates shall be provided with a transcript in form of literal grades for the units taken during the year with one of the following recommendations:

            (i)  Proceed to the next year of study.

            (ii) Repeat the year externally

            (iii) Proceed to the next year of study conditionally

            (iv) Discontinued

            (v) Degree to be awarded.

APPEAL FOR RE-ASSESSMENT           

  1. A candidate may appeal to the Registrar (Academic) for a re-marking of a written examination paper on payment of appropriate fee that the senate shall determine from time to time, and on surrendering the transcript on which the grade for the concerned unit has been recorded, if already issued.
  2. The final mark recommended by the appointed examiner(s) shall be the final mark and grade awarded to the candidate for the unit.
  3. No appeal for re-marking of any units shall be entertained four weeks (one month) after the candidate has been notified of the results

EXAMINATIONS IRREGULARITIES

 (a) A candidate found guilty of any irregularities during any continuous assessment or University Examinations shall be subject to disciplinary action as per the University Examination Regulations.

(b) The Senate Examination Disciplinary Committee regulations shall apply in all examination disciplinary cases.

DEGREE AWARD 

(a) To be considered for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Animal Health and Production, a candidate must have passed all the required units in their respective departments.

No candidate shall be awarded the degree without passing the Maasai Mara University Common Courses, Practical Attachments and Livestock Duties.

(c) The Final Year Project (Research Projects II and III) shall be assessed through a written report and oral presentation. The student must pass in this unit in order to graduate.

CLASSIFICATION OF DEGREE

The Bachelor of Science degrees in the Animal Health and Production and, shall not be classified, however a minimum of 64 required units taken during the four years of study. The 64 required units shall not include University Common Courses, and Livestock Duties units

7.           MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

The B.Sc in Animal Health and Production is housed in the Department of Animal Sciences in the School of Tourism and Natural Resources Management. Leadership is offered by the Dean of School. Quality assurance of the programme is accomplished at the Directorate of Quality Assurance through the Senate, School Curriculum Board and the Departmental curriculum board.

7.1 DURATION AND STRUCTURE

  1. The BSc in Animal Health and Production runs for four full time academic years with a total of eight semesters. The number of courses per semester per year is indicated in Section 7.2.
  2. Each academic year will consist of two semesters, 15 weeks’ long
  3. A candidate must complete a minimum of twenty-four (24) weeks of attachment in a recognized institution. In addition, an examinable research project must be in a specialized area selected by the candidate.
  4. Candidates admitted with Diploma with a minimum grade of credit into the BSc in Animal Health and Production degree programmes in the STNRM, as per the Departmental entry requirements, may be considered for exemption in units equivalent to one academic year.Such students shall join the relevant programme at the start of the second year of study, unless otherwise specified by the respective department.
  5. A candidate in the B.Sc. Animal Health and Production shall be required to undertake practical attachment for a period of not less than eight (8) weeks each year during the second and third years of study.

7.2 COURSE DISTRIBUTION TABLE

S.NO.

UNIT CODE

COURSE CONTENT

Lecture Hours

Practical Hours

Credit Hours

 

SEMESTER 1

 

 

 

  1.  

CMJ 1100

COMMUNICATION SKILLS **

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP 1101

GROSS ANATOMY

45

45

4.5

  1.  

AHP 1102

ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY I

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 1103

BIOCHEMISTRY I

30

30

3.0

  1.  

ZOO 1100

HIV/AIDS AND LIFESTYLE DISEASES   **

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP 1104

ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

30

30

3.0

7.      

AHP 1105

ZOOLOGY

30

30

3.0

8.      

AHP 1106

AGROMETEOROLOGY AND ECOLOGY FOR AGRICULTURE

30

15

2.5

 

SEMESTER 2

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 1201

ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY II

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 1202

BIOCHEMISTRY II

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 1203

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY

45

45

4.5

  1.  

COM 1200

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION LITERACY **

30

0

2.0

  1.  

AHP 1205

BOTANY

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 1206

PHYSICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

 

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 1208

PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION

30

15

2.0

SECOND YEAR

S.NO.

UNIT CODE

COURSE CONTENT

Lecture Hours

Practical Hours

HOURS

 

SEMESTER 1

 

 

 

  1.  

ENS 2100

ENVIRONMENTAL SKILLS **

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP  2101

BIOSTATISTICS

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 2102

ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY

45

45

4.5

  1.  

AHP 2103

GENERAL PATHOLOGY

45

45

4.5

  1.  

AHP 2104

BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL DISEASES

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 2105

GENETICS AND CYTOGENETICS

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 2106

PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL NUTRITION AND FEEDING

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 2108

RUMINANT AND NON-RUMINANT PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT

45

30

4.0

 

SEMESTER 2

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 2201

ANIMAL HEALTH

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 2202

VIROLOGY, PROTOZOAL AND RICKETTSIAL DISEASES

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 2203

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 2205

ANIMAL BREEDING

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 2206

PASTURE, FORAGE PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 2207

PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT OF EMERGING LIVESTOCK

45

30

4.0

  1.  

REL 2100

PHILOSOPHY AND CRITICAL THINKING**

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP2208    

INTERNAL ATTACHMENT (8 WEEKS DURING LONG VACATION)

0

320

4.0

THIRD YEAR

S.NO.

UNIT CODE

COURSE CONTENT

Lecture Hours

Practical Hours

CREDIT HOURS

 

SEMESTER 1

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 3101

RANGELAND MANAGEMENT

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 3102

VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY

45

15

3.5

  1.  

AHP 3103

PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 3104

ANIMAL HEALTH – II

 

 

3.0

  1.  

AHP 3105

THERIOGENOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 3106

ANIMAL PRODUCTION – I

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 3107

AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES, EQUIPMENT

AND MACHINERY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 3108

ROUTINE FARM PRACTICES

0

120

4.0

 

SEMESTER 2

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 3202

ANIMAL FEED FORMULATION

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 3202

VETERINARY PUBLIC HEALTH

45

45

4.5

  1.  

AHP 3204

ANALYSIS OF FOOD AND FEEDSTUFF

30

30

3.0

  1.  

AHP 2315

SANITATION AND WASTE CONTROL

30

15

2.5

  1.  

AHP 3206

AQUATIC ANIMAL AND WILDLIFE HEALTH MANAGEEMTN

30

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 3207

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

45

0

3.0

  1.  

BBM 3200

ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS **

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP 3208

VETERINARY EPIDEMIOLOGY

45

15

3.5

9.      

AHP 3209

FIELD ATTACHMENT (8 WEEKS DURING LONG VACATION)

0

320

4.0

FOURTH YEAR

S.NO.

UNIT CODE

COURSE CONTENT

Lecture Hours

Practical Hours

CREDIT HOURS

 

SEMESTER 1

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 4101

FOUNDATION OF DAIRY TECHNOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 4102

MEAT TECHNOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 4103

ANIMAL WELFARE, BIO-SAFETY AND ETHICS

30

15

2.5

  1.  

AHP 4104

RESEARCH PROJECT -I

0

60

2.0

  1.  

AHP 4106

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMACO-BIOTECHNOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP4107

SOCIOLOGY, RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND EXTENSION STUDIES

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP4108

DISASTER MANAGEMENT

30

15

2.5

 

SEMESTER 2

 

 

 

  1.  

AHP 4201

RESEARCH PROJECT - II

0

60

2.0

  1.  

AHP 4202

LIVESTOCK POLICY AND LAW

30

0

2.0

  1.  

AHP 4203

LIVESTOCK BY-PRODUCTS PROCESSING

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 4204

DAIRY TECHNOLOGY

45

30

4.0

  1.  

AHP 4205

LIVESTOCK ECONOMICS & MARKETING

45

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP 4206

FARM ACCOUNTING

30

0

3.0

  1.  

AHP 4207

ONE HEALTH CONCEPT AND APPROACHES

30

15

2.5

  1.  

AHP 4208

FOOD QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SENSORY EVALUATION

45

30

4.0

**- COMMON COURSES

 

1.0. UNIVERSITY VISION, MISSION AND PHILOSOPHY

1.1Vision

The Vision of Maasai Mara University (MMU) is “To be a world class University committed to academic excellence for development”.

1.2 Mission

The Mission of Maasai Mara University is “To provide quality University education through innovative teaching, research and consultancy services for development”.

1.3 Philosophy

The Philosophy of MMU is “To promote holistic education for both students and staff through teaching, research, innovation and extension, in order to promote social, economic and political development of Kenya and beyond and to realize sustainable conservation of the environment through natural resource management and tourism”.

2.0 INTRODUCTION

Leisure and recreation have been part of human life since time immemorial. They both manifest themselves in forms that range from traditional play, sports, cultural festivities, ceremonies, arena games, rituals to contemporary tourism, leisure and recreation practice. In East Africa, traditional societies practiced recreation and leisure in the form of societal cultural activities that were mainly social gatherings that brought together members of the society. Also, unstructured play was to be observed to a large extent in children. The twentieth century witnessed a growth of new forms of leisure and recreation as witnessed in sports and travel in the region. However, the new forms did not mark the end of the traditional forms of recreational and leisure.

The major population of local inhabitants of East Africa has historically engaged in activities that are physically demanding. Their diet has consisted of food grown organically and so considered healthy to a large extent. The two factors have coupled to keep at bay lifestyle ailments for most of the local inhabitant of East Africa. In addition, societal gatherings helped to bond and harmonize the community. This way the elderly who enjoyed high standing during these events kept track of the happenings in the society, felt cared for and got an opportunity to refresh.

However, the onset of modernity disrupted the traditional patterns of community life. New forms of recreation and leisure have emerged. New food sources have shifted the people’s diet. Other factors that have a bearing on people’s health including motorized transport, desk based work/leisure, income, and education level and individualism have combined to increase the susceptibility of people to lifestyle induced conditions like obesity and diseases. That a loose communal fabric has emerged is not in doubt.

 Programming for leisure and recreational activities gains momentum in the scenario outline above for not only does the two offer individuals, families or groups an opportunity to enjoy, refresh , rejuvenate and exercise but the whole society’s wellbeing is catered for.

Recreation and leisure has been demonstrated to play a key role in personal growth and development of people. Also, the role of recreation and leisure as forms of therapy for people recovering from illnesses or drug or alcohol abuse, persons with disabilities and the elderly has been well documented and called recreational therapy. However, its potential has not been fully investigated or exploited in East Africa.

Recreational and Leisure activities take place in many environments but more so in parks (urban or upcountry) and other natural landscapes. In this program, students learn theory and concepts to get grounding or foundations, how to develop and manage recreational and leisure activities and use a visitor centered approach to manage natural resources as well as manage tourism attractions. In addition, they acquire critical marketing skills. The element of innovativeness and critical thinking skills cannot be overemphasized and it’s envisaged that the critical inquiry units will help develop this skill.

Parks and wilderness areas are tasked with a dual mandate of ensuring the sustenance of natural resources as well as providing a quality visitor experience. Recreation and leisure brings impacts that threaten this mandate.  It is important that students learn skills to offer quality visitor experiences as well as manage resources sustainably. This course aims to develop individuals that can create that balance. In addition, the role and value of play as a leisure or recreational activity has not been extensively explored in East Africa. This program will offer students the opportunity to study the theories and concepts of play and expose them to empirical methods that can be used to study or to develop individual and community programs that promote play for a healthy society. With the above synopsis in mind, the objectives stated below have guided the design of the program.

2.1 Program Overall Goal

The overall goal of the PRLM program is to train individuals that comprehend leisure and recreation theories, concepts and practice and are able to apply them in developing, designing, managing and marketing or investigating programs that cater for the needs of a wide range of leisure and recreation participants.

2.2 Expected Learning outcomes of the program

  • Students should gain knowledge on the philosophical and theoretical foundations of leisure and recreation.
  • To expose students to knowledge and skills required to design, plan and manage recreation activities
  • Students should gain knowledge on marketing and promotion of leisure and recreational activities.
  • Develop individuals who are able to critically analyze information or situations in order to innovatively design programs that foster a quality experience for leisure and recreation participants.
  • Develop individuals who can create a balance between natural sustenance and a quality visitor experience
  • Develop individuals who are able to undertake research to generate new knowledge in the areas of recreation and leisure

2.3Program philosophy

This program is premised on the philosophy that leisure and recreation are essential for people to be productive and for a better society. Leisure and recreation are individual pursuits with the society providing a platform.

3.0 TARGET GROUP

This program targets:

3.1 High school graduates who meet the minimum entry requirements

3.2 Graduates from other disciplines who wish to change careers

3.3 Existing employees who need to advance careers and capacity

4.0 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Candidates must satisfy the minimum entrance requirements for the university. Candidates with equivalent qualifications may also be considered.

4.1 Direct Entrants from School.

Candidates must meet minimum University entry requirements. Besides  subjects in  Cluster  I (English  or  Kiswahili) and  a Minimum pass in Mathematics, candidates  must  have passed  the  KCSE in  Cluster  III (any  subject  in group  I  or II)  and Cluster IV (any subject in group I or group III or any subject in group IV or group V). The above requirements and clusters may change from time to time.

4.2 Privately Sponsored Students Program

  1. Candidates must have passed K.C.S.E. with a minimum grade of C+ or 2 principals at A Level.
  2. Diploma  holders with  credit  pass in  Tourism  Management,  Travel and  Tour  Operations Management will join in Year II of study
  3. Diploma holders from a recognized institution who will have attained a PASS in a related Tourism and Leisure program BUT have an additional minimum of 3 years experience as a Leisure or recreational professional will be admitted and join in Year II
  4. Certificate holders in Tourism Management, Hotel Management, Travel and Tour Operation Management, Parks management or recreation and Leisure management will join first year of study. Four year  Diploma  holders with  two  Attachments and  Credit Pass  will enter  in  the third year of study

  5.0 DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME

The duration of the degree course normally extends for a period of 4 academic years.

6.0 REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

To be able to satisfy all the requirements for graduating in this program:

  • Candidates must satisfy a requirement of a minimum of 182 credit hours. A candidate must not exceed 196 Credit hours.
  • Candidates must also, as part of the units, complete one industrial attachment in relevant sectors.

7.0 PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

There  are a  total  of eight  semesters  in the  complete  four years  PRLM  training period  each academic  year is  made  up  of  two semesters  that  consist of    distinct Courses . A  Course  is a  specific  learning and  instructional  unit which  falls  within a  main instructional  theme, and  consists  of specific  learning  objectives (aims)  that  are supposed  to  be covered within that course.

Table 1: Program Structure

SEMESTER

COURSES

 

NO.

CREDIT HOUR

1

7

20

2

8

23

3

8

24

4

7

21

5

8

30

6

8

27

7

8

24

8

   

7

22

TOTAL

59

191

A  Credit hour  is a  one-hour  lecture per  week  per semester or three  hours  of practical  per  week per semester.

8.0 ASSESSMENT

8.1       Common University undergraduate examination regulations shall apply

8.2       For the courses, Continuous Assessment shall normally constitute 30% of the final marks and the End of Semester Examinations 70%.

8.3       Field Courses will contribute part of continuous assessment for each course from Year One to Year Four.

For the Courses, the distribution of Marks will be as follows (Table 2) except for the Industrial attachment, Swimming and survival techniques and the senior project.

Table 2: Marks Allocation

ALLOCATION 

MARKS

 

Problem Based Group participation

5

Course Term Paper/Field course Report

10

Sit-in Continuous Assessment Test

15

 

 

End of Semester Examination   

70

TOTAL

 

100

 

9.0 MONITORING AND EVALUATION

This will involve progress report on the degree program within the School. The program will be reviewed every 4 years.

10.0 CURRICULUM STRUCTURE

YEAR ONE

10.1 SEMESTER I                                                                                        

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 1103

Concepts of Leisure

3

TRM 1103                 

Introduction to Tourism         

3

WRM 1103         

 Introduction to Natural History of East African Fauna and Flora

3

RLM 1104

Creative Inquiry in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management

2

RLM  1105

Concepts of Play

3

CMJ 1100

Communication skills

3

ZOO 1100

HIV and AIDS and lifestyle diseases

3

 

10.2 SEMESTER II             

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

MAT 1200

Quantitative Skills

3

RLM 1203

The Profession and Practice in Parks Recreation, and Leisure Management

3

RLM 1204

The  Recreation and Leisure Environment

3

TRM 1203                             

Service Operations and Marketing

3

WRM 1203         

Introduction to Natural resource Management

3

RLM 1205

 

Conceptual Foundations of Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

COM 1200

Computer and Information literacy

3

WRM 1205

Swimming and Survival Skills

2

 Sub- Total                                                                                         43

YEAR TWO

10.3 SEMESTER I              

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 2103

Administration/Management in Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

RLM 2104

 

Serving Diverse Populations in Parks, Recreation and Leisure Management

3

RLM 2105

Delivery Systems for Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

RLM 2106

Program and Event Planning in Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

TRM 2103     

Tourism Economics

3

RLM 2107

Tourism Geography

3

REL 2100

Philosophy and Critical thinking skills

3

10.4 SEMESTER II        

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 2203

Legal Aspects of Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

RLM 2204

Sport Management

3

RLM 2205

Recreation Resources Management

3

RLM 2206

Recreation and Society

3

TRM 2204

Tourism Policy and Planning                

3

TRM 2205

Tourism Product Development    

3

TRM 2206

Tourism and Environmental Management     

3

Sub- total                                                                                           45

YEAR THREE

10.5 SEMESTER I        

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 3103

World Geography of Parks and Protected areas

3

RLM 3104

Safety and Risk Management in Parks, Recreation and Leisure

3

RLM 3105

Facility Planning and Operations

3

RLM 3106

Behavioral Concepts in Parks, Recreation and Tourism

3

RLM 3107

Therapeutic Recreation

3

RLM 3108

Leisure Lifestyle Management

3

RLM 3109

Recreation Policymaking

3

 

10.6 SEMESTER II      

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

BBM 3200       

Entrepreneurial and Work skills   

3

RLM 3203

Global Perspectives in Leisure and Recreation

3

RLM 3204

Visitor Services and Interpretation

3

RLM 3205

Spatial Aspects of Tourist Behavior

3

TRM 3203

Destination Management                     

3

TRM 3204     

Consumer Behavior                       

3

RLM 3206

 

Special Event Management

3

RLM 3207

Camp Organization and Administration

3

RLM 3208

Field Attachment

6

Sub-total                                                                                          51

YEAR FOUR

10.7 SEMESTER I             

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 4103

Personnel Administration in Parks, Recreation and Leisure Management

3

RLM 4104

Methods of Recreation Research

3

RLM 4105

 

Therapeutic Recreation and Mental Health

3

RLM 4106

Leisure and Aging

3

RLM 4107

 

Therapeutic Recreation and Aspects of Disability Across the Lifespan

3

RLM 4108

Trends in Sport Management                                                      

3

RLM 4109

Advanced Program Planning                                                        

3

WRM 4104      

Planning and Management of Protected Areas                                                           3\

3

10.8 SEMESTER II

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT HOURS

RLM 4203

 

Methods of Environmental Interpretation

3

RLM 4204

Advanced Tour Planning and Operations

3

RLM 4205

Conference/Convention Planning and Management

3

RLM 4206

Community Tourism Development

3

RLM 4207

 

Sports Information and Event Management

3

RLM 4208

Senior project

6

RLM 4209

Advanced Recreation Resources Management                          

3

RLM 4210 

Sustainable Tourism            

3

RLM 4211     

Contemporary Issues in Tourism       

2

  Sub- total                                                                                         53

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 192

 

 

Collaborations and Linkages

University of Pau-France

It was requested that MMU to host one French Master of Tourism student for internship in 2014.The details to be discussed between Dean Tourism MMU and Director Tourism University of Pau France after the conference.

Clemson University - U.S.A.

Exchange research, training and workshop conference Developing a tourism information system for Maasai Mara Game Reserve

University of Bordeaux 3-France

Establishment of a French Language Institute/ centre Maasai Mara University is currently teaching French language to students undertaking tourism, arts and hospitality courses.

Aarhus University- Denmark

Establish and promote joint research, development projects and academic cooperation with focus on the Maasai Mara (ecosystem, living conditions, economic growth and biodiversity)

Regents University-London-U.K

Areas of collaboration: Education cooperation and articulation programmes. Research collaboration Exchange of students, faculty and staff members Joint consultancy activities Knowledge transfer Participation in seminar and academic meetings Exchange of academic materials and other information.

Kenya Industrial Estates

Create incubation centers and incubate student's projects with potential for commercialization. Attachment of MMU staff to enterprise funded through KIE for purposes of gaining experience that would be ploughed back into teaching.

University of Hertfordshire.- London-U.K

To conduct a survey to identify current research, educational, policy and regulatory activities (Governmental, academic, NGO)

University of Munster, Germany

The parties agree to collaborate in the following area of mutual interest: Explore possibilities for joint research programmes, Exchanges for students.

Physical Address

Maasai Mara University

P.O. Box 861 - 20500, Narok, Kenya 

Email: info@mmarau.ac.ke

Tel: +254 020 5131400

Admission Enquiries: reg.aa@mmarau.ac.ke
 
Maasai Mara University is ISO 9001:2008 Certified.
 

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